Can You and Your Teen Stop This One Tech Habit?

How many notifications pop up on your desktop or smartphone each hour? I’ve noticed with my clients that they get gazillions of notifications!!

I’m on a mission to banish the notification from you and your teen’s technology. Parent’s aren’t excluded here!!

Check out the video to hear more, and pay attention to the one exception I’ll allow.

Hey, don’t have time for the full video? No worries, I’ve got your back. Here’s a short summary:

I have a new… tirade. You see, I work with most of my clients via Zoom on the computer, and I have my client’s share their computer screens so I see what they are doing. And I have seen far too many teenagers when they are on their computer getting nearly constant notifications! This drives me crazy because I watch as their eyes flick over to each one, and while usually, they come back to attention pretty quickly, I’ve noticed that there is usually a pause… and their thoughts are distracted and or slow to think about the next thing. As a result, I’ve decided I want all my teenagers and their parents to practice stopping all notifications.

Gretchen Wegner, Notifications, Social Media, Computer sounds, Attention, Energy, Brain science,

The brain science is so clear that all these notifications are draining our energy and fracturing our attention. So I am challenging all my clients and their parents to stop all notifications, at the very least, during the time you are trying to study or work, with one exception. Notifications from your calendar/reminder app that are there to help keep you on track. But I want those to be the only notifications.

So, let me know how it goes. Feel free to send me an email at Gretchen@gretchenwegner.com and let me know what your experience with this is. I’d love to hear from you. And if you want more academic and life tips and guides based on brain science please consider checking out my online course.

College Prep Podcast #165: How to Help Students Budget Their Money Before College

Megan Dorsey, Gretchen Wegner, College Prep Podcast, Budget, Budgeting, Money, Teens, students, college, financial, financesBudgeting is a skill that many adults don’t have! However, it’s a super important skill to teach your students before they go off to college.

On today’s episode, Megan and Gretchen discuss some tips for how to get started helping teens practice how to take care of their finances.

We discuss:

  • what specific skills do students need to master before leaving for college
  • how to talk to your teens about how to make financial choices
  • what financial problems to look out for in their first year of college,
  • and more!

Click here to tune into Megan and Gretchen’s discussion on finances, budgeting, and preparing your student for college.

Should You Remind Your Teen To Do Homework?

Hey there teens, do you feel like your parents are checking in on whether you’re doing your homework or not too often? Parents, do you feel like your teen isn’t getting their homework done – and are you checking in on them regularly?

As an Academic Life Coach, I meet with both my clients (who are often teenagers) weekly and also their parents for checkups. And so I have a client I just had a session with who is finishing up his freshman year in high school, and one of the things we were talking about this week is how often his parents should be checking in on him regarding his homework. This week’s video is for both you parents and teenagers out there, regarding parent’s checking in on their teen’s homework.

Hey there, don’t have time for the full video? No worries, I’ve got your back with this summary:

As teenagers, and we’ve all be there, we start seeking our independence. It’s not unusual that when we hit our mid teens that we start wanting to fend for ourselves, and this includes academically. As I was saying, I have a client, who is just finishing up his freshman year in high school, and he feels that his parents are checking in on his homework way too much. Now, he has ADHD and a bit of a perfectionist, and therefore in his previous years he’s had a history of not getting homework turned in on time or at all. As a result, his parents would regularly check in with him regarding his homework to make sure he was getting it done, and in middle school, this worked great. However, now he’s pushing back against them, and he said something that I felt was very insightful.

Should You Remind Your Teen To Do Homework?, Parents, Teenagers, Adolescents, Teenage Stubbornness, Homework, Accept Consequences of Actions, Independence, Freedom,

“I don’t want my parents to be right. I don’t want them to think that I’m doing my homework because THEY told me to.” He wanted to be doing it because he knew he needed to for his future. And I can totally relate to this, and I’m sure a LOT of parents out there if you think back to your teenage years you’ll have a similar story to mine. I remember in high school I had an Algebra teacher who told me and reminded me regularly, that I could have an A in his class. My father, who is a mathematician, also was convinced I could have an A, and so they both regularly were checking in on me and pushing me to get an A in that class. As a result, I pushed back, and decided, “No, that’s their goal, I don’t care, and I’m not going to get an A.” Sure enough, I got a B in that class. Similarly, my client says that most of the time when his parents check in on him he’s already doing his homework, but because they check in with him, that makes him feel stubborn and he will often STOP doing his homework because of it.

There comes a time when teenagers want to start feeling more independent, and we as parents and guardians need to let them accept the consequences of their actions so that they can learn from it. Now, of course, this advice isn’t applicable to all families, as I don’t know the specifics of your situation and your parent/child dynamics; however, I did think this was a theme worth sharing – that sometimes when we as a family check in too often on our teenagers we are getting in the way of them experiencing their own independence.

As always, if you found this tip useful, or if you have any questions feel free to email me at Gretchen@GretchenWegner.com and if you feel you need help with your academics please consider looking at my online course!

College Prep Podcast #161: Advice Parents and Students Don’t Want to Hear

Advice Parents and Students Don't Want to Hear, Gretchen Wegner, Megan Dorsey, College Prep Podcast, ACT, SAT, Planner, Course Selection, Change, College Admissions, Note TakingSometimes educators have to dish out advice that families simply don’t want to hear.

In this episode, Megan and Gretchen detail their most unpopular advice for students and parents.

The advice folks don’t want to hear includes:

  • Course Selection: You need to take more courses than you’re planning on.
  • How Long Change Takes: I can’t make your student perfect right away. It takes time.
  • College Admissions: You’re clearly not going to be admitted. Adjust your college list.
  • Daily Note-Taking Habits: You’re going to need to spend some time honing your notes after every lecture.
  • Improving SAT/ACT Scores: Simply taking the SAT/ACT again and again won’t increase your score, and
  • Writing in Planner: Yes, you need to write things down on paper, even if your school keeps all your assignments online.

Although parents and students often don’t want to hear it, this is the best advice we have! Tune in to hear the details about what exactly the advice is and why it’s importance for parents and students to take heed.

Every Student, Teacher, And Parent Should Memorize This ASAP

Hey Y’all, I’ve got a very special video for you today. I strongly believe that every student, teacher, and parent out there should memorize what I call The Study Cycle. It needs to be a part of the daily language in classrooms and households. Normally I keep this video locked up in my paid online courses, but today I’m releasing it for you to watch for FREE!

Check out the video here. And then — if you’re a teacher, tutor, school administrator or academic coach, please considering joining me for my upcoming course The Art of Inspiring students to Study Strategically. We start on February 27th. You will learn everything you need to know to ensure that students have the tools they need to rock their learning with or without you!

Hey there, while I HIGHLY recommend watching this particular video in full, here is a summary:

The Study Cycle is composed of 3 steps and is the most effective, efficient, and anti-boring method I know for studying. So before we begin going over the steps, I have a little image here, which we will be referencing.

 

The Anti-Boring Approach to Powerful Studying | The Art of Inspiring Students to Study Strategically | Gretchen Wegner | Teacher | Teachers | Tutors | Academic Life Coach | Academic Coach | Academic Coaching | Academic Coaches | Tutors | Tutor | Study Skills | School Administrators | Parents | Parent | Student | StudentsWe start with the basket of knowledge and skills at the bottom of the image, this is what we need to learn, and we need to get this into your beautiful brain at the top. So step 1 is encoding the information from the basket into our brains. In this step, we are getting the information into our brains, whether we are teaching it to ourselves or it’s being taught to us.

Step 2 of The Study Cycle, which the majority of students skip, is practice retrieval. This is the process of getting the information out of our brains and assessing what we actually learned. By doing this, we get two very important pieces of information. The first is what we do know, what we actually did learn in step 1. The second is what we didn’t encode in step 1. What we didn’t learn, or encode, we put back into the basket of knowledge.

Then we have step 3. Step 3 is one of the least practiced steps, but just as important or more important than the other 2. Step 3 is to encode the information we assessed we didn’t learn in step 2 in a NEW way. The important thing is NOT just to try to re-encode it the same way you did in Step 1, but to encode the information in a new way.

My course, The Anti-Boring Approach to Powerful Studying, for students, and The Art of Inspiring Students to Study Strategically, for Educators, both are filled with a wide variety of tools to help students encode information in new ways. So check them out, and I look forward to hearing from you.

Eight Reasons to Apply to Canadian Universities

8 Reasons to Apply to Canadian Universities & 4 Reasons Not to | Megan Dorsey | Gretchen Wegner | Whitney Laughlin | College Prep PodcastDid you know that you can save more than $20K a year by going to Canadian Universities, as compared to American ones?

There are many other reasons why American students might want to consider Canadian universities. Join us as guest expert Whitney Laughlin, Ed.D maps out the reasons why you ought to consider Canada for higher education.

  • Differences and similarities between the Canadian and American university systems
  • 8+ reasons benefits to choosing a Canadian university over an American one
  • 4 reasons why you might NOT want to consider a Canadian university
  • how to get scholarships in Canada
  • and more!

The free resources we mentioned on this episode include the Canadian government’s website about their university system, an informative newspaper article about the Canadian university system, and this index of colleges and universities.

Whitney Laughlin, Ed. D is an independent college consultant who works with families to choose the perfect college for them in either Canada or the United States. Check out her website to find out more about her college and career counseling services, workshops, and nonprofit consulting work.

Click here to head over to the College Prep Podcast to listen to this episode.

Scams to Watch for Related to College Planning & Admissions

Scams to Watch for Related to College Planning & Admissions | Megan Dorsey | Gretchen Wegner | Parents | StudentsWhen parents and students are afraid of their college prospects, they’re more susceptible to scams that prey on this fear.

In today’s climate of expensive schools that seem increasingly competitive, this fear and susceptibility can be a problem for families. During this episode, Megan helps us identify:

  • what is a scam versus what is a legitimate opportunity
  • the top five kinds of scams you should be on the look out for, and
  • questions to ask yourself to make sure you’re not spending money on a scam

Click here to head over to the College Prep Podcast to listen to this episode.

5 Fears Students Have That Need to Be Acknwledged

Gretchen Wegner | Megan Dorsey | The College Prep Podcast | Fears | Students | Student | Success | Acknowledged | Homework | Tests | Teachers | Teacher |

Sometimes adults forget that being a student is an emotionally taxing job, that students have fears, and that students often need reassurance!

On today’s New Year’s episode we discuss the five ways that feelings get in the way of student success if they’re not acknowledged.

Each of today’s tips is inspired by a video from Gretchen’s YouTube channel. Tune in to get the low-down on each of these tips, or go directly to the videos that inspired them in the first place:

Click here to head over to the College Prep Podcast to listen to this episode.

7+ Books That Megan & Gretchen Should Read

Gretchen Wegner | Megan Dorsey | Books | Educators | Parents | Read | Success | Reading | The Art of Inspiring Students to Study StrategicallyDo you ever buy books that are important professionally but never get around to reading them? Megan and Gretchen both have books on their shelves that they haven’t read yet.

Listen in as they list these books, and explain why they’re important for educators and parents to read. Maybe doing this podcast will also inspire Megan and Gretchen to actually get reading!

Here’s the list:

Click here to head over to the College Prep Podcast to listen to this episode.

Safe, Fun & Life Changing Adventure Travel Trips for Teens

Gretchen Wegner | Megan | Claire Perrone | Adventure Travel | Teen | Teens | Moondance Adventures | students |

This week on the College Prep Podcast with Gretchen Wegner and her co-host Megan Dorsey:

Ever considered adventure travel as an interesting summer option for your teen?

There are many companies that take teens on cool trips around the world and build their life and leadership skills, to boot.

On today’s podcast, we interview an expert in the field of adventure travel. Claire Perrone, of Moondance Adventures, started off as a 12-year-old on her first Moondance adventure. Since then, she has transitioned from the role of student to a leader to Community Service Director; so she can speak about adventure travel for teens from a few different perspectives. Specifically, she, Megan and Gretchen discuss:

  • What is adventure travel?
  • What are the benefits to students of participating in these types of trips?
  • How can you tell if your child is ready for this type of experience?
  • What should parents look for when finding the right trip for their child?
  • How is a Moondance trip different from the hundreds of other travel opportunities?
  • What is the affordability of adventure travel trips?

Moondance is a teen adventure travel company based in Nashville, TN. They offer 25 awe-inspiring summer programs for high school aged students, domestically and abroad. Check them out on their website or their popular Instagram feed.

Click here to tune into the podcast and learn more about adventure travel.

How to Help Teens Who Struggle with Anxiety

Gretchen Wegner | Megan | Yshai Boussi | Family | Therapy | Therapist | Anxiety | Teens | Stress | Students

This week on the College Prep Podcast with Gretchen Wegner and her co-host Megan Dorsey:

Anxiety in teens is on the rise! At least, this is Megan and Gretchen’s experience working with students all over the country.

Guest expert Yshai Boussi, a family therapist, helps us understand more about this phenomenon.

In this super insightful discussion, they discuss:

  • The difference between anxiety and stress
  • Why anxiety can sometimes be helpful
  • What causes anxiety in teens
  • How parents can help students with their anxiety
  • How to be involved in your student’s life without micromanaging and accommodating for their anxiety

The free resource that Yshai recommends for teens is Reach Out, a website chock full of useful advice for teens about how to get through the hard times.

 Yshai Boussi is a therapist in private practice specializing in adolescence and family therapy. Yshai has been working with adolescents for 20 years. Over the last 15 years, Yshai has sat with and helped hundreds of anxious and overwhelmed teens and parents as a family therapist. Find out more at www.portlandfamilycounseling.com.

Click here to listen to this insightful podcast episode.

When Grades Are Low, Should Student Be Allowed to Continue Extracurricular Activities?

Megan | Gretchen Wegner | College Prep Podcast | Grades | Students | Activities | Grades

This week on the College Prep Podcast with Gretchen Wegner and her co-host Megan Dorsey:

Should parents take away student’s activities if their academic grades are not up to snuff?

Megan and Gretchen weigh in on this important question from a listener, about how to work with her middle school age daughter who loves to participate in a dance troupe, and who has made great strides in her difficulties with math but still continues to struggle.

Here’s the specific question from mom Alissa:

My husband and I are at odds about how to encourage our daughter to keep up the good work.  She’s a dancer and we told her last year that she could not audition for the dance company unless her math grade was a B and she had turned in all her work.  I was fine with that, but now since seeing her most recent test scores, he wants to make her continued participation contingent on her math grade.  I do not like that solution because it punishes not only her, but the other dancers.  I think she’s struggling with math and can use this year to figure out how to balance her life in the low risk environment of middle school. I also don’t want to set her up for such an epic punishment if she brings home a C or even a D.

Click here to listen to this free episode of the College Prep Podcast!

A Handy Tool for College Students to Start the Semester

I’m excited to share with you a handy tool for college students.

This was taught to me by a real live student (shout out to Harrison!). He is a sophomore in college and interned with me over the summer.
I LOVE this tool that he makes for himself, and I wanted to share it with you all — including a tweak or two that I’d make to it.

Check out the video, and then PLEASE forward it to any college students you know could benefit from this handy little one-page organizational tool.

For more time management and study solutions for students, parents and educators, please sign up for the Anti-Boring Approach to Successful Studying Course HERE

8 Tips for When to DIY vs. Hire an Academic Professional

GRETCHENPODCAST122

Should you hire a tutor, coach or consultant? Or should you DIY for just a little longer?

During this episode, Gretchen and Megan help you decipher when it makes sense to spend the big bucks and get professional help…and when you don’t need to!

Specifically, they discuss the following 5 types of academic experts that families often like to hire, who work outside the school systems:

  • Tutors
  • Standardized test prep professionals
  • College application consultants
  • Academic life coaches
  • Mental health professionals

In considering when it makes sense to hire out, and when it makes sense to DIY a little longer, Megan and Gretchen discussed these 8 questions families should ask themselves to decide:

  1. How important (e.g. life or death!) is the situation?
  2. What resources does the school already provide, and is it enough?
  3. Is this a topic for which there is limited time and chances in order to succeed?
  4. Are your home relationships deteriorating because you’ve been doing it yourself for too long?
  5. Will it be more convenient to work with this other person, and are you willing to pay for convenience?
  6. How motivated is the student who will be receiving the support?
  7. What are your family’s finances?
  8. Would you save more in the long run if you had a professional help you get started?

Got any questions or concerns on this topic, or any other? Want them addressed on our podcast (free coaching! yes!)? Please email us at collegepreppodcast.com and tell us all about it.

“This podcast was originally on www.collegepreppodcast.com

8 Tips for When to DIY vs. Hire an Academic Professional

8 Tips for When to DIY vs. Hire an Academic ProfessionalShould you hire a tutor, coach or consultant? Or should you DIY for just a little longer?

During this episode, Gretchen and Megan help you decipher when it makes sense to spend the big bucks and get professional help…and when you don’t need to!

Specifically, they discuss the following 5 types of academic experts that families often like to hire, who work outside the school systems:

  • Tutors
  • Standardized test prep professionals
  • College application consultants
  • Academic life coaches
  • Mental health professionals

In considering when it makes sense to hire out, and when it makes sense to DIY a little longer, Megan and Gretchen discussed these 8 questions families should ask themselves to decide:

  1. How important (e.g. life or death!) is the situation?
  2. What resources does the school already provide, and is it enough?
  3. Is this a topic for which there is limited time and chances in order to succeed?
  4. Are your home relationships deteriorating because you’ve been doing it yourself for too long?
  5. Will it be more convenient to work with this other person, and are you willing to pay for convenience?
  6. How motivated is the student who will be receiving the support?
  7. What are your family’s finances?
  8. Would you save more in the long run if you had a professional help you get started?

Got any questions or concerns on this topic, or any other? Want them addressed on our podcast (free coaching! yes!)? Please email us at collegepreppodcast [at] gmail [dot] com and tell us all about it.

“This podcast originally ran on www.collegepreppodcast.com

Tips to Wrap Up the Summer without Stress

Tips to wrap up the summer without stressThe beginning of the school year is always crazy and stressful for families.

But if you follow these tips for wrapping up the summer, you’ll save yourself some stress later on.

It’s an investment of time that’s well worth it. 

Here’s the basic checklist:

  • Update your resume
  • Get basic school supplies before stores run out
  • Finish the summer assignments
  • Make appointments to talk to people from school
  • Put all the dates from the school’s calendar into YOUR calendar
  • send thank you’s to anyone who helped you
  • Ask for recommendation letters
  • Attend orientation
  • Write goals for the year

Now listen in so that you can hear Megan and Gretchen’s commentary about each one!

How to Make Your Social Media College and Job Ready

Colleges are increasingly checking out students’ online social media profiles to decide whether they are worthy of admission into their schools.

Colleges are increasingly checking out students’ online social media profiles to decide whether they are worthy of admission into their schools.

How college and job ready is your social media presence?

Megan shares some stories, tips and tricks about how students and families can ensure that social media won’t be a reason to miss out on getting into your favorite college, including:

  • stories of students who didn’t receive scholarships or key athletic positions because of their social media presence
  • 5 kinds of things NOT to post on social media or via email
  • several tips for hot to monitor social media usage so that you are college and job ready

 

Looking for more tips about how to get prepped for college? Click here.

Here’s An Easy Fix to a Teen Calendaring Problem

Time management and organization are vital pieces for successful study habits and grades.

All too often, students do not have their cell phones or calendars attached to their laptops. In this video, I offer a simple way to connect and see the “big picture” of what needs to be done each week.

I am hoping everyone can benefit from this helpful tip!

For more helpful time management and study solutions for students, parents and educators please sign up for the Anti-Boring Approach to Successful Studying Course HERE

How Parents Undermine Their Teens’ Self-Sufficiency

I get it: as a parent, you want what’s best for your teen, and you’ve hired me — an academic life coach! — to help your teen learn the skills necessary to be a success. However, are their ways you might undermine the very coaching you are paying for? Read on:

Parent To the Rescue

Because I do most of my coaching on Skype, I’m able to see some of my clients during their off period while they are at school. The other day I got an email from a student saying that he might be late because he’d accidentally left his iPad (the source of his webcam) at home, and he needed time to problem-solve an alternate method of calling me.

To my surprise, he showed up right on time after all, on his iPad no less!

Evidently, his father had rushed the iPad over to school in time for our session. According to this client, this was the third time this week that a parent had delivered something that he forgot at home.

Now, I don’t blame these parents in the least. They’re spending good money on academic coaching, and don’t want it to go to waste because of their son’s forgetfulness. However, by diving in to help their son fix the problem, the parents inadvertently interrupted him as he tried to problem-solve his mistake. They also taught him that it’s ok to forget things because they are always available to rescue him.

Advice From a 3-Year-Old: Worry About Yourself

The video that I posted at the top of this entry is perfect advice to parents: “Worry about yourself!” This young gal wants desperately to buckle herself into her car seat, and she rejects her father’s incessant interference in her process. She is clearly not figuring out the buckling mechanism, but gosh darnit, she is hell bent on trying! And she’d prefer that her father go off and do his own thing. “Go drive!” she commands him.

In the case of my client, what might it have looked like for the father to “worry about himself” rather than readjust his day to deliver his son the iPad? How did the father’s habit of “worrying about his son” undermine an opportunity for the son to practice self-sufficiency and learn from his mistakes?

Making a New Plan for Self-Sufficiency

During our session the son came up with a great plan for remembering to pack  his backpack.  Several sessions ago we’d established what we fondly called the “Yay! I’m Done with Homework Ritual!”, which includes the following steps (as written by my client):

  1. Put all my stuff in the correct folders
  2. Put the folders/binders in my back pack
  3. Put my backpack by the door

After carefully recalling each moment of forgetfulness, he realized that, although he was doing a good job of putting his backpack by the backdoor, he was actually leaving some assignments  next to his backpack rather than in the backpack. The next morning he would be in a hurry, and grab the backpack, but not the items next to the backpack. Hence: forgotten work.

He also realized that he charges his iPad overnight, which means he can’t pack it in his backpack during the “Yay! I’m Done with Homework Ritual!” This client came up with the idea of leaving his backpack near where he charges the iPad, and in fact, putting the iPad in his backpack while it’s charging. So the new ritual reads as follows:

  1. Put all my stuff in the correct folders
  2. Put the folders/binders in my back pack
  3. Put my backpack where I charge my iPad

Time Will Tell

Now we will need to see whether my client can follow through with this ritual. Time will tell. I’m going to ask his parents NOT TO REMIND him about the ritual, so that his success is entirely dependent on whether he remembers to do it! If he doesn’t remember, I will process that with him, and we will go from there.

How Donnel Learned His Lesson the Hard Way

Another client, Donnel, is a senior in high school with newly diagnosed ADD. He drives himself to my sessions, and so is completely self-sufficient in this regard. Early on, though, he totally forgot one of our sessions and didn’t show up. Luckily, I offer one “freebie”, and so I didn’t charge him; however, I did make an agreement with Donnel and his mom that, were this to happen again, Donnel would owe his mother $85 for the missed session.

Several month later, Donnel missed the session again without giving me 24 hour advance warning. As promised, his mother charged him $85 (a debt which he has finally paid off a few weeks ago). Although I know it was annoying to Donnel to have to owe his mother, it was well worth the money.

As the final weeks of senior year have ramped up, he has consistently given me 24-hour warning since then, which is a great feat for a young person who struggles with attention deficit. By being held accountable for his own forgetfulness, he has learned to put all activities on the calender, check the calendar regularly, communicate ASAP to people affected by schedule changes, and (perhaps most importantly) that he’d rather live debt free. Not a bad set of lessons.

Being a parent is not easy!

So why make it harder for yourself by worrying about your kid. Take this wise little 3-year-old’s advice (it’s just so cute and profound, I can’t help but post this again):

Parents: Would You Enjoy This Email From Your Teen?

Keyboard with three family keys

Lately in my academic coaching practice, my teen clients have been writing their parents emails. This is just an experiment, but I think it’s going well and I wanted to share.

My rationale is that teens are much more likely to accept reminders to do their homework if they actually ASK their parents to remind them. Seems less like nagging that way! So I talk them through what their goals are, what kind of support they’d like from their parents, and how to request it of them.  The kids type the email and then we click send!

Here’s a recent email written by a 16 year old boy (I added a few periods for readability, as well as the clarification in brackets, but otherwise it’s all his):

hi
mom

gretchen and i have made a list of stuff i need to do over break. we figured out it would take like 9 hours to do it all. i really wanna go snowboarding over the second week of break [so I need to get my work done before Christmas].

our plan is to start on monday from after i wake up and eat and stuff. ill start my homework and work on it for like 2 to 3 hours. i would like you to remind me to get started on it and check on me a few times. i was wondering if that would work for you or if your gunna be out buyen me presents? 😉

* monday history corrections
* tuesday geometry chapter 6 hw
* wednesday math corrections
* thursday spanish project

and i was wondering if i could reward myself everyday when i finish my work by going and doing something fun like going and hanging out with my friends?

thanks

simon

Emails such as this are such a recent addition to my coaching, I haven’t actually checked it out with the parents yet. I’m looking forward to finding out if they enjoy receiving them, and if so, how it’s helping support their relationship with their teen at home?

If there are any parents out there reading this, what do you think? As an academic coach potentially working with your teen, how can I best support you communicating with each other around homework and school obligations? I’d love to know!

And teens: can you see yourself making requests like this on your own (without a nosy academic coach interfering?). I’m curious!!