Teach more Effectively With a New Tiny Habit?

Have you been looking for a quick and inspiring way to set a new intention to improve your teaching this spring?

Classroom teachers are such overworked and underappreciated educators that I sometimes hesitate to make suggestions for how they can transform their teaching to be more “study” friendly.

I’ve been challenging myself to come up with a list of short, 30-second habits that are relatively easy for educators to incorporate into their classrooms…and that pack a punch in terms of results with students.

Check out the video below, during which I share the 3 steps to designing a tiny habit that might transform your teaching this semester…with relatively little extra effort!




Don’t have time for the full video? No worries, here’s a short synopsis:

I want to ask you, “What if one 30-second habit could absolutely transform the way you teach and the way your students respond to your teaching in terms of being more self-sufficient and becoming more independent with their learning?” I’ve been playing around lately with lists of habits that if teachers just took one of these habits on, how it could vastly change the dynamics of their classroom. Today I’m going to be talking about what the parts of a tiny habit are, and I’ll be sharing some tiny habits at a later date.

So let’s look at a tiny habit. A tiny habit consists of 3 parts.

Gretchen Wegner, Teach More Effectively with a new tiny habit, teaching, teachers, teacher, academic coach, academic coaches, tutors, tutor

First off, a tiny habit is 30 seconds or less. Then they are attached to something you already do in the classroom or at home when lesson planning and that you’re already doing habitually. The third part is that it completes the sentence “After I [do habitual task] I will [do new habit].” For example, “After I write the task on the board I will ask students how will you prove that you know this information?” This is an example of one tiny habit that I am convinced that teachers can easily incorporate into their curriculum without a lot of added effort. In this case, it’s about asking a certain kind of question that gets students thinking about their learning.

If you are a teacher, tutor, or academic coach, or perhaps even a parent, interesting in learning more about not only tiny habits but about how to help your students become independent learners and test-taking powerhouses, please consider checking out my course, The Art of Inspiring Students to Study Strategically.

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