The first wave of final exams are upon us, which means (drum roll, please!) best papers writing services for school prednisolone rectal foam essay on buying a car enter site go to site ed triangle 50 pill essays on hyderabad watch find how to use viagra chemistry formal lab report example custom essay writing service professays source link where can i buy viagra online conjoined twins research paper topic thesis structure examples source site help with writing research papers http://jeromechamber.com/event/how-to-write-your-undergraduate-dissertation-pdf/23/ follow site help on writing a essay http://www.trinitypr.edu/admission/phd-thesis-dissertation/53/ http://admissions.iuhs.edu/?page_id=cialis-delivered-overnight l arginine natural viagra click here essay on paryavaran sanrakshan in hindi professional writing services for personal statements 2007 american best essay history bactrim ds for sale https://artsgarage.org/blog/thesis-statement-generator-for-a-compare-and-contrast-essay/83/ http://v-nep.org/classroom/e-paper/04/ it’s time to map out the final exam study schedule.

This is easier said than done. I’m saddened that most teachers seem to pass out final exam review information *only* a week before finals. From the student’s perspective, one week of a study time for 7 classes is simply not enough.

If we really want students to learn to plan out their projects and become effective time managers, we need to give them the tools they need to do this. For a majority of students to do a thorough job planning and studying for their final exams, two weeks is necessary.

In the case of Cassandra, the student whose schedule is pictured above, we sat down to map out her study schedule 2 weeks before finals began. At this point we had information for 3 of her 7 classes, so we began to map them out on a calendar. Cassandra preferred to think through exactly what task she needed to do on each day in order to be ready, and so we wrote these tasks on her schedule. Click on the picture if you’d like to see it in more detail.

Tony, on the other hand, preferred to study only one subject each day. As a result, his study schedule looks like this. You’ll note that we put his schedule in the middle of the white board, and then around the edges we wrote specific steps for him to do to study for each of the classes. Click on the picture to see it in more detail.

It doesn’t matter how you choose to map out your time; what’s more important is that you make a plan! In fact, you might not stick to every detail of your plan; however, by taking the time to think through all your tasks in advance, you’ll be more likely to study over time, rather than cramming the night before.

Good luck, and let me know if you have any questions!

What is your study schedule like? Let me know in the comments!

P.S. If you know a student who you think could use this information, be sure to forward this article!