The first wave of final exams are upon us, which means (drum roll, please!) pay for my investments speech stem cell research paper introduction go our planet is our home essay https://heystamford.com/writing/customessay/8/ https://www.atom.edu/phd/tadacip-della-cipla/21/ erection dysfunction viagra https://bigsurlandtrust.org/care/buy-clobetasol-propionate-ointment-online/20/ case study unfair competition click my hobby essay quotations essays on copyright infringement cset physical education essays https://willherndon.org/pharmaceutical/cialis-5-mg-farmacia/24/ kate chopin story of an hour essay nolvadex malaysia enter precio oficial de levitra kubla khan thesis antithesis synthesis levitra perigoso epistemology thesis topics follow link http://directory.kean.edu/?writes=sample-sat-essays-that-received-a-12 action being construction essay feminist identity life social yourself translate homework english to french propecia cheap fast shipping here free essays about friends https://servingourchildrendc.org/format/essay-on-professionalism-in-sports/28/ dog essay in sanskrit language go go here it’s time to map out the final exam study schedule.

This is easier said than done. I’m saddened that most teachers seem to pass out final exam review information *only* a week before finals.¬†From the student’s perspective, one week of a study time for 7 classes is simply not enough.

If we really want students to learn to plan out their projects and become effective time managers, we need to give them the tools they need to do this. For a majority of students to do a thorough job planning and studying for their final exams, two weeks is necessary.

In the case of Cassandra, the student whose schedule is pictured above, we sat down to map out her study schedule 2 weeks before finals began. At this point we had information for 3 of her 7 classes, so we began to map them out on a calendar. Cassandra preferred to think through exactly what task she needed to do on each day in order to be ready, and so we wrote these tasks on her schedule. Click on the picture if you’d like to see it in more detail.

Tony, on the other hand, preferred to study only one subject each day. As a result, his study schedule looks like this. You’ll note that we put his schedule in the middle of the white board, and then around the edges we wrote specific steps for him to do to study for each of the classes. Click on the picture to see it in more detail.

It doesn’t matter how you choose to map out your time; what’s more important is that you make a plan! In fact, you might not stick to every detail of your plan; however, by taking the time to think through all your tasks in advance, you’ll be more likely to study over time, rather than cramming the night before.

Good luck, and let me know if you have any questions!

What is your study schedule like? Let me know in the comments!

P.S. If you know a student who you think could use this information, be sure to forward this article!